Detroit Diesel “Coup d’Etat” – Viva Music Album Review

March 8, 2012 in Album Reviews

Tracklist: “Crash and Burn” * “Let’s Pretend” * “Just Like Falling” * “Dance of the Dead (feat. Scott from Ivardensphere)” * “Black Flag” * “Never Looking Back” * “Speak No Evil” * “Isolation” * “Underfire” * “The Playground (feat. Dracos from FGFC820)” * “War Never Changes” * “Let’s Pretend (Remix by Grendel)” * “Speak No Evil (Remix by Terrolokaust)” * “War Never Changes (Remix by CeDigest)

Detroit Diesel – “Coup d’Etat” – Viva Music Album Review:

Out toward the end of this month, on Mar-30 with Deathwatch Asia, Detroit Diesel’s third album, entitled “Coup d’Etat” is instant coup de foudre. With a very valiant texture and feel, the album assembles new tracks in a sufficient amount to get one’s ears pricked and to manage to keep the level of attention heightened and uneven – from good to better, that is. Alongside own compositions, remixes provided by Grendel, Terrolokaust and CeDigest, as well as features from Ivardensphere and FGFC820 are represented in the album – and the final product looks just awesome.

With an incisive and great electronic beat, “Crash and Burn” is a very palatable musical experience. It truly creates a horizon of expectations that is satisfied throughout the album. With a blaring signature beat and with interspersed discourse from what seemingly is a protest, the feel of “Crash and Burn” is carried on by the ensuing gem of a song, “Let’s Pretend” (also available on the album: the remix by Grendel). “Let’s Pretend” creates a wonderful bridge from the protest of “Crash and Burn” and the hallucinatory effect of “Just Like Falling”, a track that most certainly won’t go unnoticed in any playlist, no matter its company. Not only it is powerful, but it is also memorable, and its impact is multifaceted – you can actually experience the track with all your senses. Add to this good job “Dance of the Dead (feat. Scott from Ivardensphere)” and you are seriously falling into a sound philosophy of indomitable dimensions. You have to love it, because it sounds pretty amazing and it’s keeping a silent pledge with danceability, too. 

Further on you are up against the discovery of the “Black Flag”’; which, unlike its predecessor tracks, does not surprise, but confirms a certain affinity to very communicative and dance friendly tracks – one more cannot really harm your oath to vibrate to very potent and straightforward beats. “Never Looking Back” causes the same type of commotion, as well as the ensuing “Speak No Evil” (also available as “Speak No Evil (Remix by Terrolokaust)” on the album); and it enmeshes its sounds to the prevalent gripe of previous tracks. “Isolation”, although tricking listeners into believing it is going to change the paradigm, continues with added grandeur the melodic line of the album, and reassembles piece by piece a sort of musical creed of the band, it’s a version of Detroit Diesel in a nutshell or if you wish Detroit Diesel for beginners.

Special mention should be also made of the following tracks, “Underfire” and “The Playground (feat. Dracos from FGFC820)”, the latter definitely striking as a Viva Music favorite, as well as of the closing track “War Never Changes” – unusually fitted as the album’s last when it should have been a mid album highlight or something. It’s irrelevant, though, since it is followed by the remixes – so it’s true sense of an ending may elude the listener, but also because it’s probably something worth exploring by other artists as well – to grant ‘last best’ position in the album to a great track, thus avoiding plateau on closure. You will definitely enjoy “War Never Changes”; the Fallout reference is there just an extra to convince you how great a track it is!

Coup d’Etat” is a wonderful find for our protesting times, and a very relevant production music wise. Enjoy!

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