Moon.74 “Newborn”: Viva Music Album Review

December 19, 2011 in Album Reviews

Tracklist: “Gun” * “The Day You Disappear” * “It’s Hurting Me” * “Strange Convention” * “We Are” * “Into My Arms” * “Dirty Mind” * “Oblivion” * “Stalking Horse” * “Moonlanding” * “Breath” * “Newborn” * “Lost

Released in October 2010 with Echozone, the debut album from electronic/EBM act Moon.74 is a recent and very pleasant discovery with Viva Music. Although released last year, we thought about sharing some impressions on the album prior to this Friday’s video release (Dec-23) – the first video by Moon.74, with music written by Dominic Hein and remixed by Rico Huellermeier.

 “Newborn” is a great find, and we thought the sharing spirit of the coming holidays is the best opportunity to share to Moon.74 fans and Moon.74-curious fans Viva Music’s review. In general terms, everything is superlative, but taking a track-by-track approach might open your appetite for Moon.74’s music, since we believe that the feel good continuum of the album deserves all the attention one can get. The opening track, “Gun”, with its alert and alluring beat made us think of Chekov’s gun, the one he said about, “one must not put a loaded gun on the stage if no one is thinking of firing it”. Gunfires will ensure, this is for sure, but their delicate intricacy might be less evident on a first listen. The glorious music of “Gun”, reverently paying tribute to all the music we like, ranging from Depeche Mode to Apoptygma Berzerk, musicians Moon.74’s Dominic Hein counts among his influences, just like the other tracks compiled on the debut album is pretty long, which might be regarded as a shortcoming in the case of some albums, but with “Newborn” it actually is a blessing. More joy to the world! “The Day You Disappear” mellows out on a similar note, but instead of creating premature plateau, takes up the good feel set by the previous track and makes it deeper and less conjectural. “It’s Hurting Me” as well as “Strange Convention” are ampler in scope, and their electronic efficiency is simply startling. With refined emotion and particularly striking openness, both songs speak up about sentiment in a manner which is intimate and general at the same time, and that makes them great above average. “We Are”, a Viva Music favorite soars in dark undertones and carries a very positive vibe, while also being a quite entertaining dancefloor choice. “Into My Arms” takes up with the same musical benevolence an intense emotional experience and creates unsuspected harmony. “Dirty Mind” shifts a little the composure of previous tracks toward a sexier sound and interest, and with its very teasing core it has a persistent aftertaste. Another memorable track, “Oblivion” exploits the same dark streak featured in “Dirty Mind” and does not seem to settle for a definition, with its very charming sound it reaches out a wider audience than the previous tracks. And after a gemstone such as “Stalking Horse”, the time is ripe for “Moonlanding”, an excruciatingly beautiful track with a very atmospheric and historical tinge of a beginning and relevant musicality. Rougher in both intent and musical rendition, it is followed by the milder “Breath”, only to commit seriously to the same realm of music with the onset of “Newborn”. On listening to the track, all mystery around why it was chosen for the title of the album as well is dismissed; it is a great addition to the album layout and a magnificent soundtrack for our contemporary lives. The ending title, “Lost” is, a very prolific piece of music, that adds to the emotions captured by the album a whole script of beauty and resilience.

Guided by the appealing voice of Dominic Hein, the journey proposed by “Newborn” is an experience worth having in your musical resume. Without adulterated sounds and without unnecessary flourishing, the album is a convincing experiment and definitely proposing a band to keep your eyes open for for live dates and new releases. And do not forget about the video release this Friday!

Moon.74Official Website | on Facebook | Discography on Discogs

 

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